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While You Were Puking: Pregnancy Medical News Weekly Update #35

Thanks for stopping by for this week’s While You Were Puking. Every week, I think there can’t possibly be more news to report yet every week, I’m fascinated to learn that more pregnancy medical news stories have broken. I guess there will always be something for scientists, doctors, and researchers to discover!

This week is chock-full of interesting news, so read on!

  • This Week’s News 1 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    Click through to see what you might have missed this week!

  • Birth Outcomes Worse for Oldest, Youngest Moms 2 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    According to new research, teenage mothers and pregnant women in their 40s are at the greatest risk for birth complications. Specifically, teens have an overall higher risk of preterm delivery, and women in their 40s have the highest risk for c-sections and infants born with defects. 

    Source: MedPage Today
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Pregnancy Carried to Childbirth Ups Risk for Rheumatoid Arthritis 3 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    New data reveals that pregnancies that result in childbirth increase a woman's risk of developing a certain type of rheumatoid arthritis known as ACPA-negative RA. 

    Source: News Medical
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Smoking in Pregnancy Triples Baby’s Risk of Meningitis 4 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    New research shows that smoking during pregnancy nearly triples a baby's risk of meningitis, and that children exposed to cigarette smoke at home are twice as likely to get the deadly disease. Ladies, STOP smoking!

    Source: International News Network
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Home Test Shows if Pregnancy Ended 5 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    New home tests that would check whether the hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is rising or falling in pregnant women were recently developed and are expected to be made available for home use. Rising hCG levels indicate a pregnancy is continuing, while falling hCG levels mark a pregnancy's end. 

    Source: The Guardian
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Obesity in Pregnancy Can ‘Program’ Kids to Develop Metabolic Problems 6 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    A new study shows that obesity in pregnancy can program children to have metabolic problems later in life, and that males are affected more so than females. 

    Source: News Medical
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Antihistamine Use Linked to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes 7 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    According to a new report, "Women with a severe form of morning sickness who take antihistamines to help them sleep through their debilitating nausea are significantly more likely to experience adverse pregnancy outcomes, including low birth weight babies and premature births."

    Source: News Medical
    Photo: iStockphoto

  • Severe Maternal Complications Less Common During Home Births 8 of 8
    Pregnancy Medical News

    To directly quote the source on this one, "the authors stress that the overall risk of severe problems is small and the results are significant only for women who have previously given birth not for first-time mums. The relative safety of planned home births is a topic of continuous debate, but studies have so far been too small to compare severe maternal complications between planned home and planned hospital birth among low risk women. So a team of Dutch researchers decided to test whether low risk women at the onset of labour with planned home birth have a higher rate of rare but severe outcomes than those with planned hospital births."

    Be sure to read the study for more! It really is quite interesting.

    Source: British Medical Journal
    Photo: iStockphoto

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