You Might Want to Reconsider that Gender-Specific Baby Shower, Summed Up in One Video

I know posts like this can sometimes make you feel like you’re being attacked if you do what they say you shouldn’t. And without fail, someone always accuses me of being a terrible person for contributing to the decline in respect for mothers of all kinds. That’s not at all what’s happening here.

I’m the first to say, “To each their own.” Unless you are straight-up harming your child, I’m not going to be the one to tell you how to parent. Breastfeed or bottle feed. Co-sleep or crib. Solids before 6 months or not until a year. Whatever works for you as a mom, go for it.

But what I will always do is shed some light on topics I think need more attention. And how we begin to force our children into very specific gender roles with the simple statements, “It’s a boy!” or “It’s a girl!” can limit their full potential incredibly.

That’s not to say that there’s anything wrong with girls who like pink dresses, or boys who love trucks. But just as true as that is the thought that girls can like trucks and boys can wear dresses — and that neither is harmful. In fact, allowing our children to not be limited by stereotypical gender roles works to everyone’s advantage.

It can be hard at first to recognize traditions that reinforce limits, but this awesome video by The Representation Project challenges us to look at gender roles differently than we’re used to. The message is important, and I hope you’ll take it to heart — without feeling attacked.

I found the story on Upworthy.
Original video via YouTube, The Representation Project

Read more of Aela’s writing on Babble and at Two Moms Make a Right.

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