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5 of the Most Surprising Wedding Trends — Ever

If you think it can’t get any worse than the dreaded (to some not all) wedding bouquet or garter toss when it comes to  wedding traditions think again. After learning about several trends that are considered normal in other countries, you might be relieved to know that bringing a stack of bills to the wedding reception for a dollar dance with the bride and groom is as weird as it’s going to get (we did the money dance by the way. I was opposed but my Mr. really wanted to. Despite the fact that I was dancing for dollars I kept it classy!). At any rate, take a look at this round up of 5 surprising wedding trends from other countries:

  • 5 of the Most Surprising Wedding Trends — Ever 1 of 6
    5 of the Most Surprising Wedding Trends — Ever

    Take a look at 5 wedding trends that just might make you gasp!

  • 30 days of tears 2 of 6
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    According to Your Tango the Tujia people of Sichaun Province, China participate in the crying ritual. It is said that 30 days prior to the wedding the bride devotes an hour each day to crying. Later her mother and grandmother join in on the tear fest. It wouldn't surprise me if you told me you cried 30 days before your wedding. I'm pretty sure I did too. For some of us simply getting to the altar can be quite a journey. Everything from bridal party drama, miscommunications with vendors and a bad 7 day forecast can elicit tears from an already emotional bride to be. But it's different for the Tujia people who cry as "an expression of joy and deep love."

     

  • Hold it! 3 of 6
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    Amongst the Tidong community of Indonesia/Malaysia the bride and groom must hold their bowels for three days. Your Tango notes that they aren't permitted to leave their house or go number one or two! Fingers crossed no one in the relationship has a weak bladder, because failing to practice this custom can result in bad luck for the couple. After three days it is back to business as usual and the couple can "begin their marriage."

  • Pucker up! 4 of 6
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    In Sweden, a groom isn't the only one who gets to kiss his bride, unless of course he stays by her side the entire wedding! According to Your Tango, based on how the "Kissing Tradition" works, if the groom leaves her side ,"all the other men" at the wedding are allowed to kiss the bride. The same goes for female guests.

  • Do NOT say "cheese!" 5 of 6
    No smiling please

    I don't know about you but I was all smiles my wedding day. But in Congo weddings are a serious matter and by serious I mean no smiles allowed. According to Your Tango, a couple can not smile during or after the ceremony or in any wedding day photos. (image made with Picmonkey)

  • Broken pieces 6 of 6
    Broken Bowl on White Background

    Polterabend is a custom practiced in Germany. As indicated in the article by Your Tango, guests arrive at the bride's home the night before (or day of the wedding) and "break any porcelain object they can get their hands on." No glass is broken as glass is symbolic of happiness. It is believed that the breaking of porcelain is good luck. And, as luck would have it the couple gets to clean it all up so that they'll know married life isn't easy, but "by working together they can overcome any challenge."

 

And you thought you had it hard because you couldn’t see your partner before the wedding ceremony for fear of bad luck. For 5 more wedding traditions you won’t believe visit Your Tango!

 

 

Photos Source: iStockphoto unless otherwise noted

Read more from Krishann on her personal blog His Mrs. Her Mr. Follow her on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. More from Krishann on Relationships:

9 Things I learned from Dating Mr. Wrong and Why I’m Glad I Dated Him

10 Habits I’ll Never Quit — Even Though They Annoy My Husband

Grandparents on Love and Relationships: 3 Lessons They Have Taught Us

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