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Study: Women Work More Hours Than Men...Mostly Unpaid!

A recent study confirmed the disparity in work done by men and work done by women. Not only do women work more hours, but they are being paid less. In fact, one group of women works just short of the 40-hour work week at home, on top of paid work outside of the home. Ladies, we men are not pulling our weight in the home!

Our household isn’t any different

My wife and I have had some recent discussions about our roles for household work as well as professional (paid) work. Both of us work from home, and we chose homeschooling for our kids. My wife does about 99.9% of the homeschooling teaching duties at this time, as well as a majority of the household duties. In addition, she directs a community of homeschooling families. Me, I work from home, help out a little with homeschooling, and do a small portion of the household work.

I’ll be honest, she does way more than I do, and I don’t know if I could handle her workload.  But I’m working on it. After being inspired by a family with eight kids who run a family business making soap, and has every person in the family (kids age 6-16) working for the business in addition to homeschooling, I thought maybe we can do things differently.  But we are not the only ones, according the study.

How does the world measure up

The study was done by The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. They tracked 28 countries in the developed world, and found that in 22 of them, women worked longer hours.  Some of the research revealed some very heavy workloads for women.

Check out the stats showing how women are outworking men throughout the world.

How do the work hours in your household measure up? Do you have suggestions on how to balance it out?

  • Study: Women Work More Hours Than Men…Mostly Unpaid! 1 of 7
    iStock_000005472659XSmall

    Click through to see some of the findings from the study comparing women's and men's working hours.

  • Italian women work almost a full 40-hour work week…unpaid! 2 of 7
    W

    The biggest disparity in the study came from Italy, where women work an average of 57 hours per week. Only 22 of those hours are paid. The rest is housework. That is about more than 11 hours more than what men work in and outside the home in Italy. My wife's workload can become stressful, but I can only imagine the stress this brings by assuming so much of a workload.

  • In all countries studied, women do most of the housework 3 of 7
    woman doing housekeeping

    The study revealed that in all countries tracked, women did a majority of the housework. This holds true in our household as well. Honestly, I wish it weren't so. I really desire to help more around the house. I'm hoping to change that soon.

  • Men shorten the gap with longer hours on their job in some countries 4 of 7
    iStock_000002577607XSmall

    In six countries, men have shortened the gap by working longer hours on their jobs. The countries are: Japan, New Zealand, Norway, the Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden. I know when I am away from home for longer than normal periods of time it can become more challenging for my wife because she is on 100% of the time. Although the total hours may be closer, I'm wondering if this happens in these six countries as well.

  • American men work 50.6 hours…most paid 5 of 7
    money in the hands

    Men get paid for the work they do. Roughly 65% of the work men do in America is paid work. Sometimes I feel like it's less for me, but it's way more than the percent of paid work for women (see the next slide).

  • American women are compensated for less than half of hours worked 6 of 7
    headache

    Women work more hours, but are paid for less than half of that work. This is primarily because the majority of the work women do is unpaid household work. The study results didn't mention wages. The paid work my wife does takes up a lot of time, but not nearly as much as her non-paid work. 

  • The way men and women feel in relation to housework 7 of 7
    iStock_000006078842XSmall

    Finally, the study revealed men are more likely to have positive feelings about housework than are women. The reason is stated that men usually pair housework with a leisurely activity. I do this, and I also make it a family affair. We have three children, ages 3-13.  I make sure all housework I do I am showing them how to do it, and having them help. Even the 3-year old. I think this is one major difference in the way my wife and I handle chores. One reason may be that I can be a little lazy. :)

Photo credits: iStock Photo

Read more from Jackie on his blog, JackieBledsoe.com. Follow him on FacebookTwitterG+Instagram, and Pinterest.

More on relationships from Jackie:

MUST SEE: Captivating Photo Essay Destroys the Idea of a Marriage Ball and Chain

Study Reveals Disturbing Reasons Why Women Remove Wedding Rings

7 Things You Should Never Say to Your Man During a Football Game

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