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The Museum of Broken Relationships: Exhibits for the Brokenhearted

museumIf you are trying to get over your ex and are able to travel abroad, you may want to consider visiting a museum — and not just any museum —  the Museum of Broken Relationships. The Museum of Broken Relationships is nothing new. Created by Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić, in Croatia, it’s even toured on an international level.

According to the museum’s website: “Unlike ‘destructive’ self-help instructions for recovery from failed loves, the Museum offers a chance to overcome an emotional collapse through creation.” By creation they mean that they allow individuals to contribute to the museum’s collection. Comparing it to rituals such as marriage ceremonies, funerals and graduations they further note that society denies us of “formal recognition for the demise of a relationship” despite the fact that we are greatly affected by such. For those of us who have gone through breakups, getting over an ex or coming to terms with the demise of a relationship can be difficult.

For some people donating personal belongings to the museum is therapeutic, for others their motives may be different, nevertheless the fact that this is an actual museum speaks to the fact that people wish to have remnants of an old love treated as art.

The notion of this museum is perplexing to me. With each of my breakups came the wish that I could simply forget. I didn’t want to be reminded of my ex or the memories we made together. And most often, I would either throw any reminders away or tuck them away only to be found later during a major cleaning or move. But when you put something into a museum and it becomes an exhibit it isn’t forgotten. It is placed on display, seemingly a permanent reminder of what was. Granted, perhaps upon donating to the museum you wouldn’t continue to go back to view the item you got rid of but knowing it is still there seems odd to me.

But that is one of the things that make us as individuals so unique. The manner in which we might seek healing varies. For some a “failed relationship” doesn’t just signify heartache. Some of our failed relationships resulted in stronger versions of ourselves, empowered and reinvented to some degree able to identify more clearly what we want for our own lives, able to use our voices and see the value we possess.

Then there are the loves lost that were beautiful loves, the relationships that ended because the saying “gone too soon” came into play. The love so beautiful you want to share it with the world and of course, you never want to forget.

Additionally, perhaps the museum is a reminder that out of hurt and pain can come something worthy of preservation and in the same way that I blog about my past hurts and challenges putting then on display in a museum might be cathartic. And it just might inspire someone else in some way, someone who is on the path that you were once on. Someone who is looking for encouragement and inspiration as they wait for their own aching heart to mend.

For more on this museum and to get a peek at some of the artifacts contained in it, visit the Museum of Broken Relationships website but before you go, tell me after breakups were you the throw everything that was a reminder of your ex away type or the save it type? Would you ever contribute tangible reminders of an old love to a museum?

 

Photo Source: istockphoto

Read more from Krishann on her personal blog His Mrs. Her Mr. Follow her on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

More from Krishann on Relationships:

8 Tips to Help You Get Through a Breakup

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8 Things I Get Annoyed at My Husband for Doing (That I Do Too)

12 Ways to Get the Spark Back in Your Marriage

14 Ways to Become More Physically Fit With Your Spouse

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