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DIY This Pretty Kimono in Less Than 30 Minutes!

Kimono tops are super popular right now, and with the heat of summer, they’re the perfect light layer that gives your outfit a more complete piece without causing heat stroke. Although they look complicated to make, they’re actually super easy! I want to share a really easy tutorial so you can make one in less than 30 minutes. Seriously, that’s all it takes. A couple of cuts, a few seams, and you’re done. Ready?

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I used a super lightweight cotton jersey blend fabric from Girl Charlee, and since knits don’t fray, I left all my edges raw which made the project even faster — no hemming necessary! Try this easy tutorial and make yourself one (or five) of these cool tops!

Materials:

Kimono Tutorial_1

Instructions:

1. Cut a rectangle of fabric roughly 48″x60″. If you want shorter sleeves and a slimmer kimono, shorten the 48″ side. If you want to change the hem length of the kimono, change the 60″ side.

2. Fold the rectangle in half, width-wise, as shown, then cut the fabric in half so you have two identical rectangles. They should each be 24″x 60″.

3. With right sides together, sew down the long side, sewing the two rectangles together. Stop at the halfway mark.

4. Fold your kimono over width-wise again (inside out), making sure the open section is in the front, as shown. Hem the edges of the opening, as shown. (This is optional if your fabric won’t fray.) Then, with right sides together, sew the short sides together (as shown), leaving a 10″ wide opening for the arm holes. (If your fabric does fray and you need to hem the arm holes, hem both short sides of the fabric and then sew up the sides.)

5. Turn your kimono right side out and trim the corners of your kimono, as shown (optional). Or, you can do a real hem. And you’re done!

Think you can do it in 30 minutes? Ready, go!

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Find more of Merrick’s style and writing at Merrick’s Art

You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter

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