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A Well Written, Reasonable Article About Mom Bloggers? It DOES Exist!

Wonders will never cease: finally, a great article about mommy blogging.As roughly 4,000 or more women bloggers descend on Chicago for the BlogHer conference this weekend, I find myself thinking a great deal about the state of blogging in general, and the way women who blog particularly mothers are treated in the main stream media.

Prior to other BlogHer conferences, local media have run articles that are super cutesy about “girl bloggers” coming to town. Luckily, Chicago is faring somewhat better with a great article with an interview with BlogHer co-founder Jory Des Jardins talking about how to grow your audience through blogging, and an editorial from Jory as well talking about finding your voice through blogging.

But you can still imagine my surprise when a week ago when The Daily Beast a mainstream media source hosted a well-researched, fairly written, honest and smart look at the world of mothers that blog.

Really.

The article tackles an important question: in a crowded field of mommy bloggers, are some moms pressured to share too much (both about themselves and their children) in order to stand out and make a living blogging?

But as the parenting platform becomes more crowded, and as more accomplished women choose blogging over other viable work-life options, will writers feel pressured to keep upping the ante, revealing more and more about their kids and their private lives? After all, there are only so many eyeballs for so many posts. And what does this mean for the kids who are the subject of all this blogging? How will they react (either now or in 10 years) to their mothers publicly sharing the natural, though previously seldom discussed, underbelly of parenting emotions?

Give it a read. It’s immensely refreshing. And see you at BlogHer 13!

 

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