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New Tech: Cavity-Free Candy?

New Tech - Cavity-Free Candy via Babble.com

Photo Credit: whartonds via Compfight cc

Imagine living in a world where your kids won’t be scared into moderation by the age-old “your teeth are going to fall out” tactic that parents pull every Halloween, Christmas, and Easter when the candy is o-plenty.

Parents will still have to pull the reins a little on kids digesting so much candy, but cavities could possibly be the least of kids’ (and parents’) worries now that scientists at the Organo Balance Lab have been conducting tests to fight the bad bacteria in food. Candy specifically has a bacteria called Streptococcus — it releases an acid that dissolves enamel when it comes into contact with teeth.

I have no idea how it works specifically I won’t bother you with all the scientific jargon. What could make this exciting for your kids (and challenging as a parent) is how the lab conducted the tests. Lab scientists created a candy filled with “good bacteria” called Lactobacillus Paracasei that attacks the bad bacteria and prevents it from doing as much damage to teeth. According to lab results conducted on human participants, the amount of Streptococcus in the saliva was significantly reduced … and I’m pretty sure not too many people said no to participating in a study where all they had to do is eat a bunch of candy.

Like I mentioned earlier, the good bacteria doesn’t do any good past protecting your teeth, but what this could possibly mean is that parents will have to devise a whole new scare tactic to keep their kids from OD’ing on synthetic candy canes in the future. Additionally, for the grown-ups, you will still need to know when enough is enough on the Valentine’s Day chocolates too.

via: Gizmodo

For more of the tech lowdown from Terrance, check out BrothaTech’s blog and follow him on Twitter and .

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