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Twitter Changes How Conversations Are Displayed

Seen weird blue lines on Twitter? Yep, they've changed how conversations appear. So, have you noticed some changes in how your conversations appear on Twitter? Well, that’s because Twitter has changed the way they look. Now, a blue line is used to thread the conversation together, making it easier to follow along.

Supposedly.

According to the Twitter blog, there’s a point to the change, even if it doesn’t make sense to you right now.

As you can see, Tweets that are part of a conversation are shown in chronological order so it’s easier for you to follow along. You’ll see up to three Tweets in sequence in your home timeline; if you want to see more, you can tap a Tweet to see all the replies, including those from people you don’t follow. We will start rolling this out to everyone today.

I wasn’t too sure about the value of this change, and neither is Slate author Will Oremus — but not for the reason you’d think. He posted about how rarely conversations happen on Twitter these days.

I had to scroll down relentlessly to find the first instance of a blue-vertical-line festoon marring my otherwise neatly chronological timeline. That’s when the rationale for Twitter’s seemingly indefensible switch-up struck me. The reason the festoons are few and far between is because hardly anyone holds actual conversations on Twitter. At least, that’s true in my timeline, which is full of techies, academics, journalists, politicians, and comedians, self-appointed or otherwise. Everyone’s too busy barking into their own megaphones to respond to anyone else. Either that, or they’re lurking passively in the faceless crowd, piping up only via the occasional timid retweet or favorite of someone else’s reverberating bark.

But change is here, like it or not. Check out the video below to see if it makes it clearer for you.

[videopost src='https://blog.twitter.com/2013/keep-up-with-conversations-on-twitter']

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