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You’ll Love How These Teenagers Are Using Social Media

history in pictures twitterOne of the reasons my husband loves the internet is the way it’s made history so incredibly accessible, particularly when it comes to pictures. He loves combing through online images of Philadelphia — comparing and contrasting our city of today, with the city of yesterday.

Apparently, he’s not the only one. Two teenagers in two different parts of the world  17-year-old Xavier Di Petta from Australia, and 19-year-old Kyle Cameron have launched a new Twitter account that has already garnered nearly a million followers.

What do they use the Twitter account for? Sharing historic pictures like these.

Interestingly enough, these two young men have a long history of creating incredibly successful Twitter accounts, according to Mashable (in partnership with The Atlantic):

@HistoryInPics is a genuine phenomenon built entirely on Twitter.

But strangely, in a world where every social media user seems to be trying to drive attention to some website or project or media brand, @HistoryInPics doesn’t list its creators nor does it even have a link in its bio. There are no attempts at making money off the obvious popularity of the account. On initial inspection, the account appears to be created, perhaps, by anonymous lovers of history.

Of course, there are problems. Many images that @HistoryInPictures shares are not in the public domain, nor do they credit the photographers for the images they share. Alexis Madrigal of The Atlantic asked Xavier Di Petta why they don’t get permission to use the photos first, he stated:

“It would not be practical,” he said. “The majority of the photographers are deceased. Or hard to find who took the images.” Then he said, “Look at Buzzfeed. Their business model is more or less using copyright images.”

Nonetheless, it’s pretty impressive to see two young people offer something so interesting that doesn’t involve anything gross or sexually inappropriate (@EarthPix is also another one of their creations). What do you think? Are you a fan?

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