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How to Pack Healthy School Snacks that Compete with Junk Food

A few years ago, I was involved in some consumer research about giving kids healthy snacks to take to school.

One of the most interesting things I remember from the focus groups was that moms didn’t just complain about the allure of junk food, but also about the allure of it’s packaging.

It seems that kids were mostly fine with eating carrots and pita chips at home but when it came to the school lunchroom and they saw other kids whipping out their shiny brightly-colored wrappers packed with Doritos and Chips Ahoy Cookies, their simple plastic baggies of perfectly-portioned pretzel sticks just wouldn’t do.

Cool packaging was synonomous with an enviable snack.

So it seems to me, if you want your kid to feel proud of a snack that isn’t junk food, the best thing you can do is find healthy snacks with cool packaging OR create cool packaging yourself.

Check out these awesome drawings created by Babalisme simply by using colored Sharpies on Ziploc bags:

What kid wouldn’t be proud to pull that out of their lunchbox?

In fact, there are a myriad of ways you can dress up a simple Ziploc bag— with drawings on the outside, colored or patterned paper on the inside or personalized printable toppers you can find on Etsy or make yourself.

For instance, check out these fun snack bag headers from Just Something I Made:

Next thing you know, the kid with the shiny bright green bag of sour cream and onion potato chips might be swiveling his head to look at your kid’s Ziploc bag of multigrain crackers.

A big thanks to Ziploc for sponsoring this campaign. Click here to see more of the discussion.

Read more of Ilana’s writing at Mommy Shorts
And don’t miss a post! Follow Ilana on Twitter and Facebook!

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