Toddler Speak: A Language All Its Own

They say the fastest way to learn a new language is total submersion. I think there’s probably a lot of truth in that, seeing as though I barely squeaked by with a C- in high school Spanish.

By the time our babies reach toddlerhood they begin to learn a thing or two about our primary spoken language. As their vocabulary grows, we parents quickly find a way to reach some kind of communication common ground. Common ground being our toddler’s butchered (and ever so adorable) version of said primary spoken language.

Chances are, you understand your toddler just fine, but for at least a little while - you might just be the only one.

When BooBoo started talking, I feverishly began of recording all his adorable mispronunciations because wow, that stuff is cute!

Throughout the early toddler phase, the following words and phrases made their way into our household lexicon:

plip plops: puppets

donbaddame: don’t bother me

yestermorrow: tomorrow (kinda still hoping that one takes off)

blooftaste: toothpaste

walnt: Walmart

bin din: blanket

incontrol: remote control

andate: bandaid

Spunbotch: SpongeBob

peanuts: name for the male anatomy

Busses were called trucks and trucks were called tractors. For a while, cows were called dogs. To be a parent is to know these things and know them well. I know I’ve called a cow a dog on more than one occasion thanks to BooBoo, but maybe that’s because we live around a lot of dogs, err – I mean cows.

“Mommy incontrol Spunbotch! Ay-Ya my bin din [wailing cry]!”, meant “Mommy turn on SpongeBob, [my brother] stole my blanket [wailing cry]!”

I always wanted to be bilingual and now that I’m a mom, I am.

What are some of your favorite toddler words and phrases?

More on Toddler Times:

How to Make Sure Your House Doesn’t Suck This Halloween

Don’t Call Me, I Have a Toddler

My Kid is Forcing Me to be Friendly

Tagged as: , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.