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Will My Daughter's Helmet Teach My Toddler Acceptance?

Say Hi to Johnny!

That is Johnny and his mom, Stevee. Stevee and I were pregnant together at the same time, and my daughter Addison is just slightly older than he is…

This week we found out our youngest child Addison, who is 7 months old, needs to wear a corrective helmet for three months for a condition called plagiocephaly. Basically meaning she has a flat spot on her head that needs to be corrected.

After having a huge mommy meltdown I started to desperately search for the positives, and the light at the end of the tunnel when it comes to having my poor little girl saddled with some serious head gear for a couple months.

And then it dawned on me … this is going to impact my boys too, especially my inquisitive two-year-old toddler, Ben. He is forever asking what, why, how … asking, asking, asking … and I know he is going to do the same about his baby sister’s helmet.

As a mom I thought it was something I didn’t want to deal with, but then I realized this is going to be an amazing teaching opportunity to show him how people come in all shapes, colors, sizes, and so on. Everyone is different whether they wear glasses or have to wear a helmet.

They may look different, have a disorder, or disease that impacts them in some way, shape, or form that is noticeable … and by showing him how normal his little sister is in her helmet, and how she is no different than he and his brother … it will teach him one of the greatest lessons kids could ever have: acceptance.

Because lets all face it … people can be cruel assholes, and I am willing to bet the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree when it comes to that in most cases. And if I teach him to be accepting of the differences people have, I can hope and pray that some day down the road, he won’t point or stare when he sees someone who is different.

I can only hope that as a parent I do a good enough job, and Addison will help teach him he is no better than anyone else because of looks.

Right?

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