10 Educational Road Trip Activities for Kids

Exercise their minds while making the trip feel a whole lot faster with these 10 educational road trip activities for kids. Start the trip out with the Alphabet Places game. Find a road sign that starts with the letter ‘A,’ and continue down the alphabet through the whole trip. Bring math and history into the mix with fun games like Break the Change and License Plate Phrases. There are games for kids of every age and ones that the whole family can enjoy. Whether you’re on the road or in the air, these educational games for kids can definitely come in handy.

Here are 10 ways your kids can have fun (and learn!) while you’re on the road …

  • 10 Educational Road Trip Activities for Kids 1 of 11
    04

    Click through to see them all!

  • Talk of the Town 2 of 11
    0128

    Have one person start by calling out the name of a city. The next person has to come up with a new city that has a name that begins with the last letter of the previous city. This is great for practicing geography skills!


    Photo via Pathfinder

  • Alphabet Places 3 of 11
    0217

    Start your road trip by looking for a word you can see from the car that starts with an 'A.' Go through the alphabet as you drive trying to find new words that start with each letter of the alphabet in order. This is a fun game for everyone to practice the alphabet.


    Photo credit: Christopher Mann McKay

  • Kids and Counting 4 of 11
    counting-sheep-2

    Pick an object before your trip that kids have to spot out. You can give each kid a different object at the beginning of the trip. Have the kids count them as you go. For instance, have them try to count as many red cars as they can see. This a fun game to do with the little ones so they can practice their counting skills.


    Photo via Yurt Alert

  • And the Story Goes on 5 of 11
    0413

    Challenge the kids to exercise their imaginations, and practice storytelling and sequence skills with this game. Have one person in the car start the beginning of a story. Each member of the car adds in their own part of the story until someone brings it to a close.


    Photo via NY Auto School

  • 20 Questions 6 of 11
    08

    Focus on a particular topic, like cities in America. Think of one, and have the kids ask questions to try and determine which city you are thinking about. You can change the topic to anything they are learning about in school to help them practice while on break.


    Photo via Get Worksheets

  • License Plate Phrases 7 of 11
    0710

    Chose a topic in school to focus on, like history. Find a license plate, and choose the first three letters. The children have to come up with phrases using the first three letters of the license plate to be the starting letter of each word in the phrase. Have the kids create phrases based on the topics they're learning in school.


    Photo via Jalopnik

  • Are We There Yet? 8 of 11
    061

    Provide the kids with a map where you have drawn the route of the trip. Let the kids study the map and mark how far you have gone as you're driving. This is a fun way to let the kids learn to study maps and to let them see how much farther you have to go.


    Photo via Latania

  • And the Cow Goes “Moo” 9 of 11
    0913

    This is a fun game for the little ones. Help them practice their association and oral skills with this easy game. When the road trip starts make up sounds for the things you see on the road, i.e., for street lights you can say "blink!" When your little one sees a street light he/she can say "blink." This works for pretty much anything you see on the road.


    Photo via Zazzle

  • How Fast? 10 of 11
    1029

    This is a super-easy game that everyone can have fun with. Tell the kids to close their eyes, and try to guess how many miles her hour they think the car is going. The person who guesses the closest number wins!


    Photo via Activities Greece

  • Break the Change 11 of 11
    0514

    This math game is great for older kids that are already studying math in school. Give the kids a total amount and tell them they need to find out how many pennies, quarters, nickels, and dimes they need to make that amount. They should also try to figure out what option will give them the least amount of change.


    Photo via Meadow's Walk

Jaime Morrison Curtis is author of the bestselling book Prudent Advice: Lessons for My Baby Daughter (A Life List for Every Woman), follow up fill-in journal My Prudent Advice, and founding co-editor at Pretty Prudent, the premier design and lifestyle blog providing inspiration and instruction to help anyone create beautiful things, food, and experiences for their friends and family.

Tagged as: , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.