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3 Most Common Mistakes: Pediatrician Visits. Pitfalls to avoid with your child’s doctor, on Babble.com.

Pediatrician Visits

Pitfalls to avoid with your child’s doctor.

by Babble Editors

August 28, 2009

 

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What are the 3 most common mistakes parents make when visiting the pediatrician?

Expert: Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky, director of 365-day medical center, Belilovsky Pediatrics, in New York. His blog is www.belilovskypediatrics.com.

1. Choosing a doctor that’s the wrong fit.

“Every pediatrician is not going to fit with every parent personality. So often I hear, ‘Oh my friends said you’re great!’ and it turns out that that while that doctor may have worked for your friend, they’re the wrong fit for you. For instance, if you’re a parent that’s deathly afraid when your child gets a fever, which is a common complaint, you’ll want a pediatrician that displays a bit more empathy toward fevers, as opposed to a doctor that quickly assures you it’s nothing serious. Also, some parents require longer dialogues and explanations than others; find a doctor that complements that. References are a great way to find a trusted pediatrician but ask your friends in-depth questions before you visit: What’s so great about this doctor? Can you describe specific episodes? Why would you choose them for your son or daughter? And of course, don’t feel obligated to stick with a doctor just because a friend referred you. They might be great at what they do, but not a perfect match.”

2. Always wanting a prescription.

“Too often, parents bring their children to their doctor, expecting to leave with a prescription. And when they don’t, they consider it a waste of time. We have a model we follow: treat, counsel, educate. This means some cases require treatment, some only require education. Example: baby acne and bug bites. First-time parents often over-react to these problems, and expect a prescription, when pediatricians can really only offer advice. Of course, if you feel like a doctor is dismissing your child’s case, seek a second opinion. But realize not all problems require the same solution. Another tip: If you don’t understand your doctor’s verbal explanation, ask him to use an analogy or diagram. I once treated a child whose father didn’t understand hip dysplasia. I found out he was a marine engineer, so I made him a diagram, and all of a sudden, he understood!”

3. Delegating visits.

“This is a minor mistake compared to the first two, but still important. And this is sending your child to their pediatrician with someone who doesn’t know the whole story, for instance grandparents or nannies. Often, these people don’t know your child’s entire medical history or the details of the problem at hand, which makes our job more difficult. Later, we’ll get calls from parents who couldn’t be there in person, and it turns out there’s a whole different story we weren’t aware of. Or, we’ll try to reach parents, only to get a call the next day wanting to know what’s going on. It’s much easier for both parties to address issues in person and for parents to get the straight story from the horse’s mouth. Obviously, sometimes parents have to work or travel but, for instance, my practice is open seven days a week/365 days a year. If you’re really invested, you’ll find a time to bring your child that works with your schedule.”

- As told to Andrea Zimmerman

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